Carrie Fisher had cocaine, other drugs in system when she died

Because the coroner was unable to determine exactly when the 'Star Wars' actress ingested the drugs, officials could not assess the impact they had on her death.
By Sarah Webb | Jun 21, 2017
A coroner's report released Monday reveals that actress Carrie Fisher, 60, had a cocktail of drugs, including cocaine, ecstasy, and heroin in her system when she fell ill on a plane from London to Los Angeles on December 23, 2016. She died three days later.

Because the coroner was unable to determine exactly when the 'Star Wars' actress ingested the drugs, officials could not assess the impact they had on her death.

"At this time the significance of cocaine cannot be established at this time," said the report," according to the Associated Press.

While morphine also was found in Fisher's system, the report states that it could have been a derivative of the heroin.

"Ms. Fisher suffered what appeared to be a cardiac arrest on the airplane accompanied by vomiting and with a history of sleep apnea," the report said. "Based on the available toxicological information, we cannot establish the significant of the multiple substances that were detected in Ms. Fisher's blood and tissue, with regard to the cause of death."

Last week, the coronor's office noted that an accumulation of fatty tissue on the walls of Fisher's arteries contributed to her death.

On Friday, Fisher's brother Todd said he was not surprised that drugs may have been a factor in his sister's death.

"I would tell you, from my perspective that there's certainly no news that Carrie did drugs," he said. "I am not shocked that part of her health was affected by drugs."

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