Supreme Court again preserves most of Trump travel ban

The ruling received praise from the Trump administration and condemnation from Amnesty International and other human-rights and immigration-advocacy groups.
By Paul Pate | Jul 20, 2017
The U.S. Supreme Court upheld President Trump's ban on immigrants and refugees from a number of Muslim-majority countries but said that lower courts could strike down other White House restrictions on family members of immigrants in a ruling Wednesday. The ruling received praise from the Trump administration and condemnation from Amnesty International and other human-rights and immigration-advocacy groups.
The justices were ruling on White House lawyers' appeal of a federal judge's ruling that had ordered the government to let in refugees who were formally working with resettlement agencies in the United States. The federal judge had also mandated that immigrants and refugees be allowed to bring in many more types of relatives than the Trump administration's immigration orders currently allow.
The Supreme Court struck the federal judge's order down and let the White House's immigration ban stand. The justices also ruled that expanding the list of allowed relatives could be a valid action, but they did not call the restrictions illegal.
Last month, the Supreme Court had heard a separate appeal challenging Trump's travel ban and had struck it down. In that ruling, the majority of justices decreed that the ban was legal. But the justices also said that refugees who have "bona fide relationships" with persons or entities in the United Statesi.e., a job or certain types of family membersshould be exempted from it.
During the appeal that the justices decided this week, Trump lawyers asked the justices to clarify what they meant by "bona fide relationships" and which family members an immigrant could claim under this definition. The justices denied this request, thereby leaving the door open for lower courts to hear challenges on the issue.
But in the meantime, immigrants will be limited to claiming only the family members that White House rules lay out for them. Wednesday's ruling additionally means that up to 24,000 refugees who have been assigned to a charity or religious organization in the United States will not be able to count on the organization being able to get them into the country.
"This ruling jeopardizes the safety of thousands of people across the world including vulnerable families fleeing war and violence," said Naureen Shah, Amnesty International USA's senior director of campaigns.

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