Tokyo blogger debunks photo suggesting Amelia Earhart captured by Japanese

But Kota Yamano, a military history blogger, says it took him only half an hour to discredit the History Channel's claim.
By Clint Huston | Jul 15, 2017
A military history buff in Tokyo has debunked a History Channel documentary, which claimed that a photograph found in the U.S. national archives proved that Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan crash-landed on the Marshall Islands and were taken prisoner by the Japanese.

The documentary, which aired Sunday, said the photograph purportedly showing Earhart on a dock on Jaluit atoll in the Marshall Islands, with her back to the camera near a man who looks like Noonan was evidence that Earhart and Noonan did not die over the western Pacific Ocean on July 2, 1937, and "may hold the key to solving one of history's all-time greatest mysteries."

But Kota Yamano, a military history blogger, says it took him only half an hour to discredit the History Channel's claim.

"I have never believed the theory that Earhart was captured by the Japanese military, so I decided to find out for myself," Yamano told the Guardian. "I was sure that the same photo must be on record in Japan."

Yamano did an online search and found that the same image was published in a Japanese travelogue in 1935, nearly two years before Earhart's disappearance.

Other experts also have found the History Channel's claims dubious.

"From the Marshallese visual background, lack of Japanese flags on any vessels but one, and the age configuration of the steam-driven steel vessels, the photo is closer to the late 1920s or early 1930s, not anywhere near 1937," said military expert Matthew B. Holly, in a report by Agence France-Presse.

---

Have something to say? Let us know in the comments section or send an email to the author. You can share ideas for stories by contacting us here.

Comments
Comments should take into account that readers may hold different opinions. With that in mind, please make sure comments are respectful, insightful, and remain focused on the article topic.