Trump caves, condemns neo-Nazis

President Trump finally came out and personally condemned the white supremacists who caused Saturday's mayhem and deaths in Charlottesville, Virginia.
By Ed Mason | Aug 16, 2017
President Trump finally came out and personally condemned the white supremacists who caused Saturday's mayhem and deaths in Charlottesville, Virginia.

"Racism is evil," Trump said Monday, as reported by The New York Times, "and those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans."

Trump's immediate failure unequivocally to condemn neo-Nazi racist ideology and the death of an anti-racist protester at the hands of a white supremacist who plowed into a crowd with a car drew criticism from all sides of the political spectrum.

The president's initial statement on Charlottesville tragedy, which denounced "this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence, on many sides," seemed to many to be purposefully avoiding condemnation of the hate groups who have been his most enthusiastic supporters.

Earlier Monday, Trump was quick to attack Kenneth C. Frazier, the head of the pharmaceutical company Merck, for resigning from the president's American Manufacturing Council in protest over Trump's "many sides" statement.

"America's leaders must honor our fundamental views by clearly rejecting expressions of hatred, bigotry, and group supremacy, which run counter to the American ideal that all people are created equal," wrote Frazier in a tweet. Frazier is one of just a few black CEOs of a Fortune 500 company.

It did not take long for Trump to respond to Frazier's resignation.

"Now that Ken Frazier of Merck Pharma has resigned from President's Manufacturing Council, he will have more time to LOWER RIPOFF DRUG PRICES."

Not surprisingly, the president's shoot-from-the-hip attack on Frazier drew an outpouring of support for the Merck executive from other business leaders.

"Thanks @Merck Ken Frazier for strong leadership to stand up for the moral values that made this country what it is," said Paul Polman, the chief executive of Unilever, on Twitter.

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