UK owes EU money over Brexit, says German prime minister

The United Kingdom will have to pay a settlement before it leaves the European Union, said Germany's prime minister, Angela Merkel, on Saturday.
By Jose Jefferies | Aug 30, 2017
The United Kingdom will have to pay a settlement before it leaves the European Union, said Germany's prime minister, Angela Merkel, on Saturday. This is not a new developmentEU and UK officials have been discussing a UK financial settlement to the EU for Brexit for several monthsbut it is reportedly a source of deepening contention and one that neither the UK nor the EU are close to resolving.
"This is about obligations that Great Britain has entered into and that naturally must remain on the books," Merkel said during a weekly podcast that Bloomberg reported in advance of the next round of Brexit talks this coming week. "It's not about the cost of divorcethat makes it sound like fines. We're still at the very start of these negotiations."
The UK's designated Brexit secretary, David Davis, acknowledged in a written statement to the UK Parliament that his country would owe the EU a "financial settlement" for leaving and said that British officials would work with the EU to determine a "fair" amount.

But the amount continues to be a sticking point. The EU has outlined a full list of funds that it wants the settlement to cover, and estimates of the total run up to 100 billion. But British foreign secretary Boris Johnson said that he does not "recognize" the figure 100 billion figure and that Britain will only pay what British officials agree it owes.

Brexit talks overall still have a ways to go before Britain actually completes its breakaway. The UK and the EU held a series of talks this summer to negotiate Brexit-related issues, such as British and EU citizens' rights, the powers an EU court might still have over British citizens, and freedom of movement across the Irish-UK border.

The British Parliament's website states that three more rounds of negotiation were scheduled for August through October, followed by a meeting of the whole European Council to talk about Brexit on October 19-20.

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