Bob Dylan submits acceptance speech for Nobel Prize

Opting to miss December's official ceremony in Stockholm, Dylan recorded his 27-minute speech, with musical accompaniment, on Sunday while on tour.
By Jeremy Morrow | Jun 07, 2017
Bob Dylan has submitted his acceptance speech for the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature and it is pure Dylan. You can watch it on YouTube.

Opting to miss December's official ceremony in Stockholm, Dylan recorded his 27-minute speech, with musical accompaniment, on Sunday while on tour.

"When I received the Nobel Prize for literature, I got to wondering exactly how my songs related to literature," says Dylan. "I wanted to reflect on it, and see where the connection was."

The musician then discusses three literary works and how they relate to his recordings: 'Moby Dick,' 'All Quiet on the Western Front,' and 'The Odyssey.' He also cites American folk music greats, such as Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly, as inspiration for his songs.

"If a song moves you, that's all that's important," Dylan explains. "I've written all kings of things into my songs and I'm to going to worry about it, what it all means."

When the Swedish Academy announced that he had been awarded to Nobel Prize last fall, Dylan greeted the news with a two-week silence and only privately accepted the award in March, according to The New York Times. To be able to collect the prize the equivalent of about $900,000 winners are required to submit a talk within six months of the ceremony, which would have been June 10.

"The speech is extraordinary and, as one might expect, eloquent," write Sara Danius, the Swedish Academy's permanent secretary, in a blog post. "Now that the Lecture has been delivered, the Dylan adventure is coming to a close."

---

Have something to say? Let us know in the comments section or send an email to the author. You can share ideas for stories by contacting us here.

Comments
Comments should take into account that readers may hold different opinions. With that in mind, please make sure comments are respectful, insightful, and remain focused on the article topic.